Posts Tagged ‘relay race’

Peak to Brew Race Report

20180811_094029Peak to Brew is a 220+ Mile point to point relay race in New York state from the top of Whiteface mountain to Utica New York (home of the extremely popular Boilermaker 15 km).  The race is similar to Ragnar but not part of the series. If you are looking for a relay race to try here’s the scoop!

Summary

  • 220+ miles
  • Point to point from the peak of Whiteface Mountain to Utica New York
  • Teams of 6 or 12 runners
  • Next runner leaves when the previous runner arrives
  • Through the Adirondacks (i.e. hilly and scenic)
  • Mostly along roads with a few trail sections
  • Total distance per runner: 11.4; 14.0; 16.7; 17.8; 18.1; 19.5; 19.8; 20.4; 21.0; 21.6; 21.9; and 24.5 miles
  • Finishes at a brewery – free beer and a great band from 3 to 8 PM
  • Mid-August
  • Prepare for the possibility of heat and rain
  • Approximately 50 teams
  • Start times range from 5 AM to 10 AM based on your predicted pace

Our running group has sent a team the past 3 years and is planning to return in 2019, so obviously we enjoyed it!

If you want more information, read on as I go into more detail on Teams; Relay Style; Is it scenic/interesting? How is the race divided up? How hard/easy is it? Honey Badger; Leg #1 The downhill monster; Terrain; Cheer and Water stations; Food; Sleeping arrangements; Post race celebrations and swag

Teams

Peak 2 Brew has two categories and provides a prize to first place in each category. First place is a growler for each runner which you can fill with the beer of your choice. Appropriate given the race finishes at a Saranac brewery.

Standard Team: Two vans with 6 runners in each van.

Ultra team: One van with 6 runners.

There are usually around 50 teams in the race.

Relay style

Because the race is point to point you must drive from exchange to exchange. Van #1 goes first. Your first runner runs to the first exchange where the next runner should be waiting. The last runner in the van will finish their leg at a major exchange where you hand off to the other van (unless you are an ultra team in which case you just keep going :))  This does require the van who is on break to keep track of how the other van is doing so they can ensure they are at the major exchange ready to go before the runner arrives. Peak 2 Brew asks teams to use the RaceJoy app to track runners progress. Be warned, some areas do not have strong cell coverage, so you need to use a combination of the app and text messages to communicate across vans.

Timing

Start times range from 5:00 AM to 10:00 AM based on the predicted pace of the team. There are no timing chips, you just hand off a snap bracelet from runner to runner.20180810_115328

These were the guidelines in 2018, actual start times are provided 2 to 3 weeks before the race and may vary slightly from the times below.

  • 5 AM start  9:30 – 10 minute/mile pace
  • 6 AM start 9:15 – 9:30 minute/mile pace
  • 7 AM start 8:45 – 9:15 minute/mile pace
  • 8:30 AM start 8:15 – 8:45 minute/mile pace
  • 10:00 AM start 7:30 – 8:15 minute/mile pace

The goal is to have all teams finish around 3 to 4 PM Saturday. If you run too fast you may be held back at an exchange to ensure you don’t arrive before the finish line is open. In the years we have completed the race, there was no time penalty for being held back, i.e. if you are held back for an hour they will not add that hour to your total race time, so think of it as a sleeping bonus. If you are much slower than predicted pace your second van might be asked to start their leg before the previous runner arrives. If you only have one van, you might be asked to have a runner start before the previous runner arrives or you might be asked to skip a leg.

Is it scenic/interesting?

IMG_3700Absolutely.  The view from the top of Whiteface is stunning. The first major exchange is at a ski jump (Tip for Van #2, why not get to there early, pick up tickets at the bottom of the hill and try the ‘”Extreme tubing” while you wait, it won’t take long). Several legs run past lakes. Leg #32 includes a trail run along the Whetstone gorge. Of course there are also long boring stretches along the road and you won’t see much except the road directly in front of you when you run at 1 in the morning.  Another exchange is at the Adirondack Experience lodge. The second major exchange is at Tupper Lake, on a hot day you can pop into the lake to cool off. The third major exchange is at the Adirondack Experience Museum. The rest of the exchanges aren’t as interesting, but let’s be honest, by then you are only interested in food and sleep. The finish is at Saranac Brewing company which is well set up for post-race celebrations.

There is always a slight chance of wildlife on the evening runs. All I have ever seen is a deer and some turkey vultures. In the past two years there have been two coyote sightings (what should you do if you meet a coyote?) and one black bear (what should you do if you meet a black bear?). Generally speaking both coyotes and black bears are probably going to be more scared of you than vice-versa. No-one was hurt and they sent out an alert using the RaceJoy app to all the teams to let everyone know where they were seen and when. The organizers do their best to ensure everyone’s safety.  We have done the race 3 years and the only times we got nervous were the occasional farm dogs (what should you do if you meet an aggressive dog?). It’s hard to design a course 220 miles long past houses and farms without passing at least one farm dog.

How is the race divided up?

There are 7 sections of the course and 6 legs in each section. Van #1 runs 4 sections. Van #2 runs 3 sections. Not all runners complete the same distance. In 2018 the total distances from shortest to longest for each runner was 11.4; 14.0; 16.7; 17.8; 18.1; 19.5; 19.8; 20.4; 21.0; 21.6; 21.9; and 24.5 miles.   Van #1 ran 125.1 miles and van #2 ran 101.6 miles.

Is it hard or easy?

Since this race runs through the Adirondacks there are a lot of hills, so the difficulty of each leg varies based on both the mileage and the hills.  Each leg is given a rating that reflects the distance and the elevation change: Easy; Moderate; Hard; Very Hard; Insane.

Easy: There are 14 easy legs. Distances range from 2.2 to 5.0 miles. Terrain will either be mostly downhill or mostly flat.  Most of the Easy legs are spread out across runners. 10 of the 12 runners get one easy leg. As an example, here’s the hill profile for Leg #29, one of the easy legs.

P2BEasyLeg

Moderate: There are 18 moderate legs. Distances range from 2.1 to 8.5 miles. This will likely be rolling hills so expect up and downhill. As an example, here’s the hill profile for Leg #24, one of the moderate legs.

P2BModerate

Hard: There are 4 hard legs. Distances range from 3.9 to 12.3 miles. like the moderate legs these are likely to be rolling hills with the addition of one really tough hill. As an example here’s the hill profile for the hard leg I completed this year. (I took a lesson from the trail runners a couple of times on this hill, and I did not lose any ground on the runner in front of me)P2BHard

Very Hard: There are 3 Very Hard legs. Distances range from 6.4 to 10.7 miles. These are tough, usually because you have some fairly serious climbs (there is one exception I will explain shortly). Here’s an example of the hill profile for a Very Hard leg.

P2BVeryHard

Insane: There is one leg rated insane, that leg deserves it’s own special section in the race report…

Honey Badger

There is only one leg officially rated insane. It’s assigned to Van #1, Runner #2, Leg #4.  It’s 10 miles and the hill profile gives you a hint of what to expect. You have a total elevation gain of 1202 feet and a total loss of 1118 feet. That means a lot of uphill and downhill. This leg is so difficult it has been nicknamed “Honey Badger” (probably due to this viral not suitable for work video about the Honey Badger)P2BHoneyBadgerElevationCompleting this leg earns you a badge of honour. Literally! You actually get a special prize at the end of the leg. You might think it’s so tough no-one would want to do it, but chances are you have that one runner in your group who says ‘ooooh that leg is rated insane, I have to try it’. In our running group we usually have 3 or 4 runners asking to do it. I’d actually like to do it next year. Yes, it would be really hard, but I would do hills to prepare. To be able to say “I did Honey Badger” and then collapse in a heap and ask someone to carry me to a massage therapists to restore my quads, hamstrings, and calves.

Leg #1 “The Downhill Monster”

I mentioned the Very Hard legs have serious climbs with one exception. That exception is Leg #1, nicknamed “The Downhill Monster” . Leg #1 takes you from the top of Whiteface mountain to the bottom. The top is an amazing place to start the race. The views are spectacular! There is a very good chance you will set a 10 km personal best on this leg as well. But be warned this leg is tough! You have to run downhill non stop for over 10 km.

P2BLeg1

If you do a little math here, that’s a descent of 2992 feet over 6.4 miles (33 792 feet) that works out to a 8.85 % grade!

If you try to slow down too much you tire out your quads, if you go too fast you will be pounding on your shins and calves. We had one runner who did not tie one of his shoes tightly enough. as a result, his left foot was sliding in his shoe as he ran.   When he finished, the bottom of his foot was hot to the touch and he had two blisters on the bottom of his foot. He did manage to pop the blisters and completed the rest of the race.  I think this leg should be rated insane as well.

But before you completely freak out, remember every year runners of all ability levels successfully complete this leg and the entire race! You can absolutely do it, just be prepared for some tight calves or quads when you finish. I recommend you plan on a little maintenance once you finish this leg.  There is a reason the next two legs for this runner are 2.2 and 3.2 Easy legs. You can do it!

Terrain

Most of the running is on roads. You might be running on the shoulder of a major road, on the sidewalk through a small town, or along a quiet country road. 6 legs include a trail run and one leg is mostly dirt road. There are a couple of legs where you run on uneven sidewalks.

Cheer and Water stations

20180810_144139On all the longer routes we asked our runners where they wanted water stops. We were almost always able to find a suitable place to pull over within a quarter mile of the requested distance. There are a couple of stretches where it’s harder to find a place to pull over safely.

On the trail runs you need some serious navigation skills if you want to meet them as they exit the trail or find a point where you can meet them mid-trail. Keep an eye out for green water coolers which contain bottled water left on the course for the runners. There was one at the end of the trail section on Leg #12.

Food

Pre race

If you are staying in Lake Placid the night before the race you can find lots of restaurants on Main St for supper. There is a Starbucks as well as local coffee spots to help van #1 get their morning caffeine fix (check opening times the night before if you have one of the really early starts!). There are a few spots on Main St where you can grab a hot breakfast if you are van #2. There is a Price Chopper on highway 86 just outside of town where you can load up on bananas, Gatorade and beer.

During the race

When you hit a major exchange you usually have two things on your mind food and sleep in that order! In 2018 at Major Exchange #1 the Skin Jumping Complex they had free bananas and granola bars. At Major Exchance 2 Tupper lake, there was a BBQ where you could buy burgers from 12 – 4. At Major exchange 3, Adirondack experience, there was food for sale from 2- 9 PM or you can drive to a nearby town such as Blue Mountain to find a restaurant. At Major Exchange 4, Old Forge, there is a campfire and marshmallow roast and check your team bag for your voucher for a free large cheese pizza at Tony Harpers Pizza. If you get to Tony Harpers before the kitchen closes at 1 AM you can order additional pizzas and drinks. If you get there after 1 AM you can pick up your pizza at the back but I don’t think you can order additional pizzas. At Major Exchange 5 South Lewis High school there was breakfast for sale. At Major Exchange 6 there was lunch for sale.

Sp2bFoodorry, I can’t tell you our usual food stops because most of the restaurants in the area are not that big and I don’t want us to be turned away from our favorite little spot because I shared it in the blog post, so you’ll just have to break out your favorite <find a restaurant near me> app.  If you see a team eating at a table with a large inflatable bear at the table come over and say hi, our bear doesn’t bite 🙂

Post race

There is plenty of beer, some tasty cider, but limited food available at the post race party. There are lots of little pubs within a 5 minute walk of the finish line. So before you start sampling all the fine Saranac brews wander down the street to get a burger or sandwich because the party goes until 8 PM and the band is great! Taking an hour to find some real food will help you find the energy to enjoy the party!

Sleeping arrangements

Pre-race

Wondering where to stay the night before the race starts? Lake Placid has lots of great little motels and hotels, there’s a good chance your entire team can stay in the same hotel.  Many hotels are walking distance from Main Street where you can find all the important pre-race destinations including restaurants, coffee shops, ice cream, and beer. Lake Placid is about a 45 minute drive from the top of Whiteface, the start for van #1. Lake Placid is about a 15 minute drive to the ski jumping complex, which is the first major exchange where van #2 starts.

During the race

One of the great challenges of these relay races is getting sleep between legs.

Tp2bnaphe first four major exchanges all have open areas outside where you can lie down. By the time you reach major exchange number four (Old Forge) it may have cooled off, so an actual sleeping bag or blanket will be useful if you want to get sleep there. We did notice a little motel very nearby as well, and thought to ourselves, if it was raining that might be worth a little splurge.

Major exchanges five (South Lewis High School) and six (Adirondack Central High school) are the best spots to get some shuteye. Both of them have shower facilities with towel rentals available, coffee, breakfast available for purchase, and a gymnasium with the lights out so you can catch some real zzzzzzzs. Of course there will be a steady flow of runners walking into and out of the gym setting up or packing up their sleeping gear, so a pair of cheap foam ear plugs might be helpful.

The best place on the entire race course to sleep is the Adirondack Central High school. The overhead fan in the gym provides some white noise that helps mask the rustle of other runners and you don’t need any Thermarests or air mattresses because you can just lie on top of the gym mats.

Post race

There are several hotels in and around Utica but not as many as Lake Placid.  Most hotels are a 15-20 minute walk from the finish area.  If you are in Van #2 you might finish before check in is available (3 PM at most hotels), I recommend grabbing a shower at the last major exchange, Adirondack Central High school before you drive to Utica. If you don’t shower at the school, you arrive in Utica tired and grubby with nothing to do except hang around the finish area or in restaurants until the finish party area opens at 3 PM or until you can get into your hotel room.  Obviously you want to be at the finish to run with your last runner across the finish line, but you will have some time to spare while van #1 finishes their last 6 legs.

The after party

2018-08-14_17-33-42The post race celebrations run from 3 PM to 8 PM at the Saranac Brewery.  Make sure to stop at the banner for a team photo. In addition to your medal, finishers also get to pick up a pint glass which entitles them to free refills during the party.  Make sure you eat some food too! You are probably sleep deprived, thirsty and hungry, that beer may go down a little too easily 🙂  The band is great and the atmosphere is fun. Take time to celebrate the fact you just ran over 220 miles! You would think everyone would leave the party by 6 PM because we are so tired, but they usually have to kick us out because there are lots of people still celebrating. You earned it!

Find more of my race reports and running related posts

 

 

 

Advertisements

Surf ‘n Turf Relay (Trenton)

Surf n Turf Trenton Race Report

DSC_7592Relay races are a great way to break up the routine! The Surf n Turf in Trenton gives you a chance to really mix things up with a run/canoe/bike/run/bike/run/swim/run.

One of the great things about being part of a running group is you can usually find allies for relay races. Our coach, JR ran this race years ago. When he told Randy about it, entering became a foregone conclusion (for Randy the tougher and more interesting the race, the better). You can enter teams of 8 people, but since the legs are relatively short, we decided to enter a team of 4 so each of us could complete 2 sections.

Leg1 – 7.5 km trail run (Randy)

DSC_7611Randy was looking forward to the trail run, he is quite happy leaping over logs and splashing through mud. After seeing the route he decided to swap his trail shoes for his road runners. It turns out the trail is basically a packed dirt path. The timing chip is attached to a Velcro strap you put around your ankle so it can easily be transferred to the next team member at the transition zone.

Leg 2 – 4 km  Canoe/Kayak (Judy & Susan)

DSC_7640The second leg is a canoe or kayak. You can only use a kayak if you enter the tin man/tin woman (where you do the race solo) or the tin mate (teams of two).

You drop off your canoe or kayak between 6 and 7:30 AM at the transition area. You have to mark the front right hand side of the canoe with a bib or tape since the bib you wear will be covered by your life jacket. The canoe must contain a buoyant rope, a bailer, a whistle, and a lifejacket for each person. You leave the canoe on the grass (separate section for the kayaks) until it is time to hit the water.

Judy and I used to do a little canoeing growing up, we know how to steer a canoe, so we volunteered to do the canoe leg. Randy crossed the timing mat and Judy ran forward to get the timing chip. We ran to our canoe, carried it about 20 feet into the water and we were off.

We quickly discovered two things: #1 – four km is quite a long way in a canoe; #2 we are slow! Judy and I both have decent upper body strength (she is a swimmer and I do strength training) and we were both putting a fair effort into the paddling but we were passed steadily the entire way (we have decided to blame our paddles, we had wooden beavertail paddles and we saw several paddles with wider blades,  they allowed non wooden paddles this year.) Our time was 56th out of 66 teams on that leg… Well, I guess we have our work cut out for us the rest of the race.

When you exit the water, you have to carry your canoe up the path and then bring your timing chip to the cyclist who must wait in the transition zone. This caused a lot of concern for the tin man/woman/mate entrants who would therefore have to carry their kayaks alone up the path unless they had a support team. Apparently last year you could leave your boat in the water. James was waiting on his bike, but Randy was allowed to come down and help us carry the canoe. Judy ran up to James handed him the chip and off he went on his bike.

We saw a few people carrying their canoes back to the cars right away, but James only had 25 km to go on the bike so we focused on getting to the next transition zone to ensure we’d be ready to go when he got there. The parking lot for the canoe/bike transition zone is about 1 km from the t-zone.  When they arrived, Randy and James rode their bikes from the van to the t-zone.  After James left on the bike, Randy rode his bike back to the van and then drove back to pick up Judy and I as we were still walking towards the parking lot. It’s a bit of a hike and we were wearing water shoes and sandals that were not designed for running or jogging to the car.

In the captains meeting they said you could leave your canoe in the t-zone and come back for it anytime up until 3 PM and their would be volunteers keeping an eye on it….more on that later…

Leg 3 – 25 km bike (James)

DSC_7655There is a map of the bike route on the mobile website, but you can’t zoom in on that map, so the road names were too small too read. They showed us all the maps in the PowerPoint presentation at the captain’s meeting. We thought we would have printed versions of those maps in our race guide, but that was not the case. The only printed map provided was a map showing the recommended driving route for support vehicles to get from one transition zone to the next.  We were slightly worried James might miss one of the turns.

You are not allowed to drive alongside your cyclist since the roads are open to traffic. But we drove the route ahead of James just to make sure the turns would be obvious. If there was a confusing turn we figured we would park and stand there to make sure he did not miss it. (this is a tactic we have used successfully at the Park 2 Brew running relay). As it turned out there were either police or volunteers at all the turns. But we did get a chance to observe a lot of cyclists working hard on the hills!  That’s a pretty hilly 25 km ride, and some of the roads have very little shoulder so you need to be comfortable riding alongside traffic.

James arrived in the transition zone about 10 minutes after we arrived. He was parched, there were a few stretches in the heat where it was hard to take a drink of water because of the climbs. Judy took the ankle strap with timing chip and off for the cross country run.

Leg 4 – 5 km Cross country run (Judy)

DSC_7670Judy brought her cross country shoes complete with spikes. But after seeing the terrain for Randy’s “trail” run, she was concerned she would have stretches on concrete for the cross country run. She removed the spikes. It turns out that was an excellent decision. The last 500 m was along a road and the rest of the race was actually a trail run. Cross country running is usually across fields, maybe up and down a few ditches. This leg turned out to be a proper trail run. Judy arrived at the finish with splashes of mud on her legs from running through puddles and convinced that she would have poison ivy (she saw lots of it on her run) Randy & James who enjoy trail running were quite jealous.

20180614_190228FYI – They mentioned the risk of poison ivy at the captains meeting and said they make an effort to clear it where they can. You have to sign a remarkable waiver for this race with an exhaustive list of risks that includes risk of choking, drowning, hypothermia, heat stroke, allergic reaction to insects, and being struck by a kayak or other participant. We were amused to discover that they missed poison ivy 🙂

The transition zone from cross country run to mountain bike was a bit chaotic. By now it was mid-day and hot. The only shady place to stand was on the road. Every minute or so a car would come through and we all had to move over (it wasn’t clear if these were racers who hadn’t parked and walked up the road like we did or others just using the road). So now you have the team members on their mountain bikes waiting to go and a hundred or so teammates hanging around the finish area moving further out onto the road trying to see if their runner is coming, the end result is a frustrated group of race organizers and volunteers desperately trying to keep the road clear.  If you run the race, make sure you park before you reach the pylons that mark the last few hundred meters of the cross country run so you don’t have to drive through all of that.

Leg 5 – 8 km Mountain bike (Randy)

Randy had his bike helmet and safety glasses as required by the race (we found out at the captain’s meeting that they permit sunglasses as safety glasses). Judy ran over to give him the timing chip and off he went! We knew there was at least one good climb on the route.  None of us do much mountain biking so we really did not know how it would go.

Off to the next transition zone where we all clustered under one big tree, the only shade around. You could see the bikers coming down the last trail, legs covered in mud (clearly a few good puddles on this leg). Randy arrived muddy but happy and James took off for the road run.

We sacrificed a blanket to keep the mud on the bike from getting all over the inside of Randy’s van and took off to the next transition zone.

Leg 6 – 7.5 km Road run (James)

At the captains meeting they referred to this leg as the death run. James listed to the description along the roads through the town. It did not sound particularly nasty, so he asked why she called it the death run. “You do this run at the peak of the day’s heat, all on pavement,  and there is absolutely no shade”  She exaggerated, James said there was a tree that provided at least 15 feet of shade along the route. Yes they did have water stops.

Leg 7 – 500 m swim (Judy)

The swim is 20 laps in a pool. No diving, feet first entry only. The swimmers either need to shower or get hosed down before entering the pool area. We weren’t sure if Judy would have time to change into a swimsuit at the transition zone, so she wore her swimsuit under her running gear for the canoe and the cross country run. A volunteer with a hose washed the mud off her legs. When James came around the corner, Judy grabbed the ankle strap, put it on, and went inside to the pool. They have volunteers to help you keep track of your laps which is great.

You are welcome to go to the viewing area to watch your swimmer as long as you are clean (i.e. if you did the cross country or mountain bike you’ll need to get hosed down).

Your last runner waits at the far pool door. It’s nice not having to rush off to another transition zone. It also means a teammate can hold the swimmers clothes, sunglasses, towel, or whatever.   They call out the bib numbers to the waiting runners when the swimmer comes out of the pool so you have about 15-30 seconds warning before they arrive at the door.

Leg 8 – 3.5 km Run (Susan)

DSC_7679The last leg is a pretty straightforward road run. No shade. Flat except for one the hill that takes you to the finish line.

The last run is only 3.5 km, which means if you want to see your runner cross the finish line you’ve got to get moving. The parking lot for the finish area is about 500 m from the finish line.  I caught up to James, Randy & Judy at the bottom of the hill about 300 m from the finish. Being the awesome teammates they are, they immediately ran with me up the hill clutching their cameras and phones and we crossed the finish line together.

The finish area

The finish area is a good set up, they posted results quickly, they have music, they have ice cream, and instead of the usual post race BBQ burgers and dogs there were some very tasty beef sandwiches and watermelon. My only complaint would be the shortage of water. They had juice boxes and a server yourself cups of water from a drink cooler which ran out.

James calf was giving him trouble so he signed up for a massage. We realized 20 minutes later that each massage table had their own waiting list or line up. When we figured this out, James was still #6 on the list for the table where we had signed up and another masseuse had only 1 person waiting. So if you want a massage make sure you check out the lines for each table, you may save yourself a long wait.

Results were posted quite quickly. We had finished 10th team overall, 4th masters.  So no need to stick around for the award ceremonies. Randy and Judy had gone to pick up our canoe while James waited for his massage. Unfortunately when they got there they found out all the canoes and kayaks left behind had been moved to a tennis court near the finish line. When they got to the tennis court, the gate was locked and we couldn’t find anyone to unlock it.

While they tried to sort out the canoe, I had gone back to the other car to get our draw tickets (strips of paper in the little bag with the safety pins). I wrote down our names on the slips of paper and asked a volunteer where they go. They sent me to the main building in the finish area. Once inside I realized the system. You drop your slip into the bag for the door prize you hope to win. We entered the draw for the local micro brewery and the bike.  We didn’t win, but I will say they had an impressive number of draw prizes this year.

Just after they completed the draw prizes, they announced a volunteer was at the tennis courts so we could retrieve our canoe. All the paddles, bailing ropes, and bailers were in piles to the side. I *hope* I grabbed the correct paddles from the pile (remember we borrowed the canoe and paddles and I had left them in the canoe, I didn’t think I’d be digging through a pile of canoe paddles trying to find them again). Our bailing rope was not in the pile :(, someone else must have mistakenly taken it. Our most excellent tide laundry detergent container/bailer was not there either, I am assuming someone took care of putting it in  a recycle bin for me 🙂

In Summary

Surf N Turf is a fun race. Trenton is a nice town. Try to find a place with a patio by the river for dinner! The race would be easier if you were a local, a lot of directions at the captain’s meeting assumed you knew the neighborhood. I think it would be easier the second time you compete and know what to expect. We managed a respectable finish in our first attempt. Next time I would recommend you print the maps from the website at home before you travel to the race, since it’s hard to read the maps on your phone and the race kit only provides a printed map of the driving route from transition zone to zone.

This race is organized by the military, so they take safety and safety guidelines seriously. That also means the majority of the teams are made up of military teams fighting for bragging rights.  This race is reasonably competitive, not a lot of ‘my first 5 km’ runners. But you don’t need to run a sub 5 minute km to have fun at Surf n Turf… we may be back 🙂

20180615_174120_001

Here the rest of my running related posts and race reports.